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and hiring education. a special welcome to all the penn staters here along with those of you covering a educational issues. we need your continued engagement. thank you for joining us and bringing along the penn state cookies. according to google news there are 45,000 stories about penn state and jerry sandusky. you have written them, you have read them and i imagine most of you have formed an opinion about and state in our actions over the last year. but beyond the headlines there's another reality, one that exists for penn state's 96,000 students, 44,000 full and part-time faculty and staff and over 550,000 living alumni. it is a world of teaching research and service. a world with an $800 million research program, hundreds of degrees offered, 24 campuses, online world campus, academic health center, law school, 157 years of tradition. it is also in world that has continued to face ongoing controversy surrounding jerry sandusky, our board of trustees, current and former administrators and me. the legal process continues to unfold as evidenced by the attorney general's further charge
of the economic downturn, the education in our country has had to squeeze from every angle, city budgets for education have dropped, state budgets have dropped, so it makes it challenging most experts would say to believe our students in the future will be competing on a level playing field with other students around the world because the bigger class size is now and less time with quality teachers. how would you improve education first of all and in fact mr. smith you suggested eliminating the department of education altogether. is that the right plan at this moment? casey: the best place is that the state level. that is where between the local school boards, teachers and parents. now i don't -- i said i wanted to take a look at the department of education, and it's possible. but they do some good things so we don't want to throw that away. but we need -- any federal organizations basically as big as the department of education there is a lot waste. just to get that money to the states. they can do it themselves and that is a state issue but it would be more economical doing that. and w
adapted easily but at this period, education and credentials. economy is fast-changing and who knows what it will throw at us? women are getting those killed and credentials that a faster rate than men are and seem to be more nimble and that filters into our society. in the book i talk about how that changes marriage and notions of fatherhood and what men can or cannot do in families or how young people have sex and make decisions and you start to see it having an influence in our culture basically. >> host: we have heard there's a crisis with girls, they learn their not strong in math and science and bears emphasis on trying to prove that and it will come as a shock that women far outstripped men in academic performance. >> guest: i have a daughter and two sons. it you occasion is the clearest argument. girls do better than boys and now they have equal as 80 scores in math and do better in verbal scores. it starts early in life and that is largely a development question. we demand a lot more of younger and younger children and girls develop faster than boys. that is where it starts and p
about education in america. every president as long as i can remember has been the education president. he is going to be the guy. i wanted to fulfill that thing. i have another thing. arthur miller said the best thing you can hope for is the end up with the right regrets. i have this regret, one of my regrets that i was not the best student. i didn't understand the teacher was trying real hard and that was his life for her life's work and i was one of those guys who tried to jar my way through and do as little as possible to get by. if i spend as much time studying as a did conniving i would have been all right. i have that regret too and it is one of the things that we have to deal with now if we are going to fix education, the kids have to understand that this is a very important moment in their lives and it is not like it was when i was a kid that you could fool around. i got lucky but even if you didn't, in those days you could get an assembly line jobs and have a middle-class life because the country would give you that but that is not the way it is anymore. let me cut to the cha
aggravated by these preferences. that means "mismatch" affects higher education. >> another two or three minutes. >> one thing we talk about is another sign of racial preference, prominent in the discussion which is the diversity interest of schools. one of the things research has shown that we talk about in the book is how much the diversity affects, moderated by the academic distance, when you admit students with large preferences they are less likely to socially interact with peers of other raises. this is very well documented by research. there is also self doubt affects of low grades. one study found students who believe they were admitted on preference are more vulnerable to serious arms threat. diversity research when looked at carefully fits nicely into c-span2 -- "mismatch" findings, talking about these various effects, then we go into problems of institutional behavior and that is a large part of the problem. wanting to demonstrate these effects but it is another to get institutions of higher education to deal with that. when you only look of the lineup to see how uniform is th
and that means the mismatch is something that affects a swath of the education. >> how much time do i have left? >> one of the things we talk about is another side of the racial preferences and the prominent in the discussions which is the diversity interest the schools and having a diverse racial climate. how much the diversity affects are moderated by the academic distance and the schools in other words when you add that students with large preferences they are much less likely to socially interact with your of the other races. this has been very well documented by the research. there's also self doubt affect into the stereotypes one study even taunt the students who believe they were admitted on a preference are more vulnerable. so the diversity of research when we look at it carefully it fits very nicely, it's very closely into the mismatched finance. so with all of this about half of the book talking devotees affect then we go into the problems of institutional behavior, and that is a large part of the problem. it's one thing to demonstrate these effects as they exist and the evidence does
challenges of the week. i'm honored to be here, your appreciation for the penn state and higher education. we need your continued engagement. again, thank you for joining us. thank you for bringing along the penn state cookies. [laughter] according to google news, there's over 45,000 stories about penn state and sandusky. you've written them. you've read them. i imagine that most of you have formed an opinion about penn state and our actions over the last year. beyond the headlines, there's another reality, one that exists for penn state's 96,000 students, 44,000 full and part-time faculty and staff, and over 550,000 living alumni. it's a world of teaching, research, and service. it's a world with an $800 million research program, hundreds of degrees offered, 24 campuses, online world campus, academic health center, a law school, and 157 years of tradition. it's also a world that has continued to face ongoing controversies surrounding jerry sandusky, our board of trustees, current and former administrators, and me. the legal process continues to unfold as evidence by the attorney generals fur
. third was this body mass of education. the education is good in some pockets of the region and that in some. how can we use smarter principles, raced to the top, whatever. but it's really focused on what are the problems. let's take our breath and move on to the others. >> so that they take care and also folks have questions. the microphones are here. what i take from this conversation i want to get your response on the advice is to think about the city is a network of players, some very large, like a henry ford medical come even some of the cultural institutions, some of the employers, et cetera. a network of players who can take their own responsibility, obviously in partnership with the government around certain sets of issues. and the michael's point about what is the right issue to tackle because in the southeast, there's no water. last time i checked, you got lots of water, the great lakes. not your problem. but there's obviously a number of issues, whether it's run energy, education, health. this strikes me as a way to get around the challenge of government is dysfun
sectors of the economy -- education, health care, energy -- that haven't really been disrupted that much in the last 25 years, what i think of as the first internet revolution, getting everybody to believe it was important, get connected, multiple devices, multiple networks, that's sort of been accomplished. the second revolution is how you use the mobility of the internet to transform other aspects of life. those are worthy, you know, great entrepreneurs across the country are supporting, and they are the industries that are going to drive, you know, the future. initially, it was sort of the agriculture revolution, kind of, you know, the midwest and then sort of the industrial revolution and then sort of the finance and media revolution, more recently the technology revolution, the next wave is where we need to be positioned as a nation, and we really need to recognize these entrepreneurs are in some ways american heroes, too, because they're the ones who are taking the risk of starting these companies that can change the world, but also make sure we have a robust, growing economy in wh
inside his head. it is not history. it is more entertaining than itg is educational.add to but it is one thing the genre to actual history. >> was your day job? >> i teach at george washington. university. >> we have been talking to thomas and here is his novel. watergate. sir, thank you for being with us here on booktv at the national book festival in. >> next, in 1995, professor irvine tran-nines discuss his book "neo-conservatism: the autobiogrpahy of an idea." selected essays of 1949 to 1995 with brian lamb. he talked at length about the development of his personal philosophy, which began with marxism in the 1940s. .. c-span: what does it mean? >> guest: what it means is that--it refers to a constellation of opinions and views that is not traditionally conservative but is conservative and is certainly not liberal. and since i and others who have been called neo-conservatives move from being liberals to being a kind of conservative, then neo-conservatism seemed like a pretty good term. c-span: i did some calculations on the 41 different essays you have in the book
legitimate and getting an education and making sure that your relationships, people were legitimately married. anything that pointed back words or made you illegitimate was not really something they wanted to talk about and have out there. it is too bad because it closed a lot of doors in our family and that is what you found in michele obama's family. very fortunate, you were able to help and truly open those doors for her family. >> at least with been -- within her family, there are those conversations happening. as i said americans, ordinary americans across the country are making these discoveries with dna testing so these conversations are happening around the country. when you talk about marriage and the importance of legitimacy, one of the other stories which talks about the variations of the american experience during slavery was the first lady's family had ancestors who were freed for decades before the civil war and one of the most interesting records i came across was a record which showed those members of her family who after the civil war went to the courthouse and lined up to ge
or spillover, to what extent have you noticed after to educate the local human population on how to modify their lifestyle or better to avoid the crossover spillover? >> there's certainly a first in bangladesh trying to educate people not to drink broad date palm sap that could potentially contain the virus. if you cook the stuff, you can kill the virus, but people like to drink it raw. it is sort of a seasonal treat. so there are things like that around the world. in southern china, that cracked down on at least the above ground. there's a black market, but the big wet markets were all kinds of wildlife are sold life for food. there's passion in southern china, they call it wild flavor. it's sort eating wildlife. not because people need protein for subsistence, but because they have money and this is considered to be very robust and tasty food. one other thing on that in terms of education and local people. i mentioned the original spillover of hiv occurred in southeastern cameroon. i went there to retrace it was probably the reader to coming out of south eastern down a river system that
develop its domestic rail infrastructure and matured through training and education and managing that rail system through the creation of a career in transportation. think about growing saudi arabia and talent and not hiring saudi arabians. many are aggressive in seeking out saudi arabian students for some programs. now, as they graduate, we will bring them on for training within the company. with the intent of starting them out in entry-level managers and engineers in the kingdom. they are starting a career. not just being hired on for a job. they did all this. they beat the competition. they won. other american companies are making a significant impact. not just on their businesses, but also on the future of saudi arabia. exxon mobil has a long tradition in the kingdom. among their success is a huge refinery about two hours north of a main city. the refinery has 92% saudi arabian employees. stretching all the way from management to blue-collar employees. exxon mobil was into saudia station before saudia station was required. we anticipate this to the same degree of the new refinery that
. nobody else can do this to the extent we can. we have very sharp people, well-educated, well schooled and trained particularly in the medical profession's to make a difference on things. and we have this ongoing research and development as background to make us all better at doing these things. so, these are the basics, and one of the things we would like to draw out today is what else is there that we should understand, what else can we do, how can we take these attributes and capabilities and maybe make them better? i won't want to monopolize all the time, but i would like to throw my desire on the table, and that is it's been a great honor, and i have to admit an eye opener at first to go around the world to places that are certainly less privileged than we are and to see the dedicated efforts of so many people not just from this country but many other countries who are trying to make a difference in places that need help with is a medical area or general health and welfare of people advancing their education, let in this venue the fundamental security, personal security through be
to not necessarily covering beats but covering narrative's. rather than just putting one person on education to try to double that entire fire house that comes at him, -- fire hose that comes at them, they can add narratives and subtract them, make sure people are involved. if they are not enrolled in those neighbor -- narratives, something will play out without their impact. >> a follow-up question -- i am not thinking of any city in particular here. with that kind of operation, let's say you have that operation in a city where the daily newspaper in town started to do some very strange things. i imagine that. it was owned by somebody who was very openly talking they were going to support particular causes, particular developments, particular parties. i imagine something like that could happen. does that add to the obligation of citizens, people like you, to do more to fill that void? or can you still -- fill the void -- is that city just out of luck? >> first of all, it is a remarkable symbol of what is happening to journalism. locally, the owners of the "union tribune" just purchased the "north
for us to make sure we are investing in the education and development of future capabilities and techniques and procedures. we've got to invest in that as we go forward. >> got into a short short follow-up on the? what does that approach apply -- apply for both contractors or? they become diminished. >> i mean, i think potentially they might ask little bit spent in terms of numbers spent in terms of numbers, but they will still play a role. they are not a limited at all spent how do you incorporate into planning what those numbers need to be? u.. >> based on their experiences. so i think that's what we're trying to capture is that right mix. what i'm saying right now is it's overbalanced. i'm trying to rebalance it again. >> got it. nate? >> yes, sir. there's a lot of discussion so far about what we want to do and can do. what are some of the areas specifically that you think that the army going forward can assume more risk in capability and competencies as we sort of deal with an era of declining or plateauing resources? >> yeah. i mean, i think it's not, i think risk and ca
. but other benefits are also important such as childcare, education and employment services, cash assistance, energy assistance. and others, housing and others, wic, school meals can also be included in the package. the technology that is available, the cloud, the enterprise architecture, the rules engine can unlearning all these terms, it makes it possible. it really expands the degree to which information can be shared and things can be streamlined. but the policies and procedures and how human beings interact with those systems behind the scenes and in front of the scenes, it's also very important. i do think there is a one size fits all kind of approach. the states along with local communities and the federal government with input from others need to figure out how a coherent vision to be made to package all these benefits together. right now in most states people who applied to the human services door are able to access health benefits. especially lowest income families. but there's a risk i think under health care reform that as states, states may split sort of the health, health peace
, google, and apple, and other countries to educate myself on what the trends in this industry are because information technology world is going to be driving our entire economy in ways we can't understand now. ewe can tell from doug's niche titch what they look at is going to be significant for all industry. privacy is one part of it, but given the active nature of the current administration, that's just a perfectly ripe area for a tremendous amount of litigation and regulation to break out. i want to make sure i understand it, and i hope you guys will take general up on his invitation to participate in that effort because initiatives coming from the national ag's association can be very, very significant as you all know. >> well, as you all can see, no longer just the down ballot state office holder slot. these ag's are making an impact across the country on a number of issues, and i hope you will stay focused on what they are doing and provide them your input. thank you so much. give them a round of applause. [applause] glnchtsz more from the conference now from the mayor rudy guiliani
education and advocacy. membership is open to all citizens of voting age, male and female. the league is an organization that does not endorse or oppose any of the local candidate or party. the league does make an effort to obtain factual information on a candidate's views and issues and then distributes this information as widely as possible. our purpose in holding this is to help you, the citizens, understand the candidates reasons and qualifications for seeking public office. to help potential voters better understand the issues that are facing congress and encourage citizens in the district to vote in the general election on november 6, 2012 only three weeks from today. a very important part of tonight's forum is the questions that you will be asking and you will have a chance to ask these candidates. we do have some ground rules. first and foremost you'll notice there are a couple of video cameras. other than that, there will be no ideography, photographs, smartphone videos, anything of the sort tolerated. and then also, turn your cell phone to silent or off at this point so we d
academy to take care of her grieving mother father during months of brokenness, sacrificing her education. the people of richmond, georgia and surrounding areas welcomed matthew home with tears, flags and salutes. the streets are lined for 17 miles from the airport to the church. local choirs joined to sing at his memorial service as a method in church that helped raise him. knowing matthew had been an eagle scout and a local boy scout by collecting pens and paper and sent them to matthew's unit in afghanistan. a dear friend, jim bunn who is involved in media had a vision and the matthew freeman project again. he dedicated much time and energy to produce a short film that launched the project on memorial day 2010. since then, with the help of so many volunteers, he can't name them all, the project has spent over seven tons of school supplies to soldiers are buried for humanitarian efforts in afghanistan. matthew small town of richmond hill, now a city of savanna and our great army bases at fort stewart and hunter army airfield in savanna air guard to help me heal by supporting the matthew
. an educational two weeks for a child. [inaudible] >> if you are not for others, no one will be for you. if you are for others, you will be for you. now or never. i would say the relevancy to you, because giving is probably not something you can afford to do now. you are in a competitive world today. one of the things you should do is hopefully you want to add your own initiatives. at a minimum to improve your stance in the world is to try to find community activities that you can get back to to distinguish your resume from the next person. it is people like me are getting resumes every day in this difficult economic environment. from high class standing people. 800 sats, they are looking for jobs. what you have to do is find a hook on your resume and show a high sense of community service. when i interview people, basically, the desire and commitment to be the best, a strong work ethic. here i am introducing a legend. you know, the legends do something different. you know, these are some of the characteristics. you can get help from the university. if numbers don't speak to you, in other words
and things in narratives. rather than just putting one person on education to gobble the fire hoses, to put somebody and have them come up with the narrative they're going to follow or add new narrative's or subtract them but really try to explain and make sure people are enrolled because if they are not, something will play out without their impact. >> a follow-up question. i am not thinking of any city in particular but with that kind of operation, in a city where the daily newspaper in town started to do some very strange -- imagine that -- somebody who wanted -- very openly to support particular causes, particular developments, particular parties. just imagine if something like that could happen. does that add to the obligation of citizens, people like you to do more, to fill that void, or can't you fill the void of the newspaper? that city just out of luck? >> a couple things. first of all, it is a remarkable symbol of what is happening to journalism, the owners of the union tribune purchased the times for less than the owner sold his house for. the assets are completely collapsing in
hard to do. that's, you know, we would -- . >> it used to be. the education system in many respects encouraged that. you would go and get a postgraduate degree to work out how to make something an mba, maybe. you don't need anymore. the way of -- the tools are there for you to engage automatically. now, you just need to plug them together. there are these stories that are emerging that are allow you to wrap around the existing system. they don't support us. and they haven't supported these sorts of entrepreneurs but our tools do. that's the really vital thing. >> i think the best thing michigan can do or the city of detroit is literally a marketing campaign like knick key, you can do. everybody has ideas. and, i mean, i was in berlin, actually, there's a panel in berlin v detroit which is interesting. you can feel the energy building. there's a come plaintiff's exhibit over there of germans v the u.s. they feel like we are faster and innovative. what you're starting to sense is build the confidence they can do it as well. we're seeing more entrepreneurship come out of here. i feel t
on education or a single one on gun control, all things that i think are important to the people of the 10th district and i think are critical votes -- [inaudible conversations] schneider. if we look at the record of this congress which is the most ineffective in our lifetimes, he voted twice with the ryan plan. he talks -- he voted with this congress over 200 times against our environment, over 28 times against obamacare. he's voted with them on issue after issue, on every core issue -- >> moderator: okay. you raised an important one. congressman dold, your votes on obamacare. you voted against it. why? dold: if we look at the affordable care act, i think we can agree there are some things -- >> moderator: by the way, you call it the affordable care act as opposed to obamacare. dold: i think we got 23 new taxes on this. the estimates in terms of the cost estimates on the new set of tenures doubled. >> it didn't double. dold: it did. now after two years it is doubling, and so i do think this is wildly troubling because small businesses are looking at how can i, in essence, pay the penalty an
and probability of ending affirmative action in education? >> well, i hope very good. my law firm brought the case gebs the -- against the university of michigan and law school. we brought that original case ten years ago, won against the law school, lost against undergrads because of sandra day o'connor who says we need 25 more years of affirmative action. now we have constitutional provisions with expiration dates. [laughter] there's -- there's -- an interesting book called "mismatched" by two liberals making the argument with empirical evidence that affirmative action is harmful to black people. what a surprise. liberals try to help, ruin black people's lives. that's the story of the book. their argument is by if it's a little bit of affirmative action, not bad, but elevating people to schools they are not ready for and where everyone else has higher scores, they get discouraged, depressed, feel stupid, drop out, easy subjects. one way liberals brushed the sad results of affirmative action under the rug is all the black studies courses which just pushes them off into a ghetto. how do they cover
are friends. it is real. i want, therefore, three times, you know, syrian turkish border. educate imagine how much is becoming a regional threat for the security region. the second thing i think united states past -- you're always talk about human rights supporting democracy, supporting kids rights and human rights. what about the serious? now, i really was crying when i was sitting the kids going to school for two years. and they might be terrorists. so my last comment is what is the incentive for, if you are just going to -- [inaudible] and i am sure those will not be good news for united states. >> i think one of the things that we haven't heard at all here, and yet should be uppermost in our minds is what went wrong with iraq, is what happened the day after. it's what you think about how you defeat bashar or getting to be part of a negotiated solution, fine, but i think one of the most telling comments was that, that it could end, this crisis could into more but the effects of it will linger on. you don't in the blood feuds and the killings and violence and the factions and everyone goes
hard in our country i could make it because education was very important to me. because of the limited educational opportunities i joined the u.s. 80 -- navy and spend four years in the military and applied for the u.s. border patrol and i was blessed with a tremendous career, tremendous family. i ended up along the border as u.s. border patrol agents going through the ranks and started using what i felt was a talent i was blessed with, being able to infiltrate drug cartels, human smuggling cartels and did more undercover work than any federal agent in the history of the government's over a 30 year career and i am happy to share those experiences because they are unique because i was the only federal agent who experienced being smuggled from mexico to the interior of the united states, going through travels by myself in the back of the trunk of a car, things of that nature. it was quite dramatic but something i did with a lot of pride because i felt going after those seeking a better life in the united states i share those stories with you in my book the shadow catcher. >> there are ma
that was almost of a decade and a half they kept up with none of the men but they had no friends who could educate with southern politics. so lincoln's image of the slave south matched the abolitionists depiction to dominate society and politics agitating for secession with slave owners. lincoln appears to have no understanding or how deeply slavery is invented the with the overwhelmingly majority it seems linkdin thought of them with no attachment to slavery there were very much like abraham again. perhaps southern whites could not imagine a pro slave or against the yen. and actively supportive session but it springfield illinois he and his friend urged lincoln and with the republican triumph. there are no such men. with no firsthand knowledge of the south and no real friends to share acquaintances, lincoln unsurprisingly did not knowledge the distinction between those advocates and others said their politicians and had no relish just like jefferson davis and alexander stephens who becomes the confederate vice president. lincoln put them altogether. he does not seem to understand being pressed by
be anywhere. you know, we're all educate canned, well -- connected. well, mostly. any device that's on your phone, your computer, in the future your refrigerator, anything that's on the internet you can get to from basically anywhere. so that's one of the things that makes defense difficult, right? so you don't have to just defend against your neighbor, you have to defend against the guy in belarus, so it's a whole different program. >> host: well, robert o'hara described you as a good guy hacker, a white hat hacker. what does that mean, and what's the motive of some of the black hat hackers? >> guest: okay. so the white hat, the good guy hackers like was explained, so, um, we're the guys who, you know, we develop skills to do the same thing that bad guys can do. so we can break into computers, but i instead of -- instead of stealing information and causing problems, we, you know, tell everyone what we did, try to work with vendors to make their products more secure, you know, give talks about security and how to make it better. and so we're -- while we can break in and do harm, we don't. w
accept any cut hurts education or that any cuts but when it's defense -- [inaudible] secondly, a lot of conservatives say that the beneficiaries of this defense spending say that it will be bad if we cut the spending. therefore, i briefly, we cannot cut the spending. but that is not what logic conservatives would accept with any other kind of government senators. when teachers say honestly the best thing we can do to stimulate the economy is hire more teachers. well, the answer to that is, of course they would say that, they are teachers. i think the best thing to stimulate the economy is to hire more conservative journalist. [laughter] >> i think it is just self-evident that that would work. [laughter] >> that is logic to consider that it rejects other forms of federal spending. there is also a form of keynesianism that sweeps into conservative economic thinking once you get into defense spending. they begin to talk about the loss of jobs at the close on a military base and the multipliers that we have is the hairdresser who, you know, is cutting the true terror won't have a job tha
to home i did a biography of brian lamb. i have done a lot of work with educators and c-span and people kept saying what is the real brian lamb light? he did not want a biography done and i pumped him and pumped them and i finally got a contracted the one and i find it came in and i said well, what do you think lexi said well, i guess i will do it and i can't say no. the nation is committed to open access information and how can i close things out? it's a wonderful story. a kind of open doors for me so that was kind of fun to do. prior to that i did have look that looked at individuals who change national policy called citizen democracy and it's a bunch of profiles of individuals unelected, unappointed individuals who went out and created things like major legislation because of their actions. >> what do you teacher at the naval academy? >> i teach political silent. i'm proud of the fact that for the last 30 years we have been the number one and people don't assume that a technical school. they get their technical education plus science education. i teach media politics and campaigns an
't ticket. is that history. it's more entertaining than is educational. it's one thing that genre can add to actual history. >> what is your day job? >> i teach at george washington university. >> talking here with thomas mallon. >>> now book tv, joan walsh presenter falls on the state of the american middle class and what should be done to ensure future opportunities for all americans. this is just over an hour. >> that's my favorite part. [laughter] good evening and welcome to today's meeting of the commonwealth of california. the place where you are in the know. i am dug sovereign political reporter at kcbs radio in san francisco and i will be a moderator for this evening's program. please insure your cell phone, pda and other noisemaking devices are turned off for at least on silence. and we will get underway in just a moment. first i'd like to tell you about some upcoming programs. this thursday, september 27, melanie, financial commentator for abc's good morning america, and paul schott stevens who is the ceo of the investment company institute will team up to discuss the future of
. that vision became food for peace. and the mcgovern dole international food education program. he also saw things sooner than others. in 1962 he said the most important issue of our time is the establishment of conditions for world peace. nine months into his first term he gave his search -- first speech on vietnam. in 1970 he warned about the dependence of the united states on fossil fuels. in 1984 he urged our american leadership to understand the complexity that challenges and the volatility of circumstances in the middle east. i believe america would be a better place had george become president of the united states. [applause] that doesn't mean his campaign was a failure. 1972 campaign to open the political process that infused a new generation with the belief in what eleanor called the politics of the impossible. that kind of politics that george and the enormous respect across the aisle and transcended partisan lines and along with it enormous, enormous achievement. there are children today, and jim mcgovern mentioned it, children today in the world living and
solyndra and prioritize things like social security, medicare and education and that is why i support a balanced budget amendment to the constitution. e. republican congressman robert dold and democratic challenger brad schneider are in a tight race for the tenth congressional district. it covers an area along part of michigan in the northern chicago severs. representative dold is running for a second term and brad schneider is the founder of the management controlling firm. the two candidates recently sat down for a debate, courtesy of chicago's wttw tv. >> the tenth congressional district has one of the most expensive congressional races in the country. as democrats try to take control for the first time in more than three years. they are aided by the recent remap of the district which makes it the most democratic congressional district in the country held by republican. the newly drawn tenth congressional district runs along made lake michigan and the wisconsin border and includes northern suburbs such as waukegan buffalo
. it was not mentioned. and it was not in our history, any idea why that could be? >> he was educated in australia and there was quite a comprehensive education on the topic of the american revolution and the american civil war but almost nothing whatsoever on the war of 1812 and why might that be? well, the british i think did not tend to regard the american war of 1812 as a particularly significant event at all. for the british it, this was just one small, kind of sideshow in the midst of a global war with napoleon. so for them the war of 1812 is the one happening on the european continent and around the globe. not the one happening in north america. that might have something to do with what is taught in australia. the fact of the matter it was not taught very much here either i think for some of the reasons that i outlined. if you look at this in military and diplomatic terms it didn't change very much for the united states. but i think it is worth taking a new look at it from a cultural perspective and thinking about what it means to declare war in a democracy and how you use popular culture t
. you think for a second. what it's like to make sure that we are able to provide a quality education to every single young child in st. louis. think about how difficult that is. then think about what that challenges like in a refugee camp. what that's like, no class from delano curriculum, no buildings. part of the reason why they were able to do that successfully in the refugee camp was because a lot of young people stepped forward and said, i'm going to find a way to volunteer and served. one of the lessons in "the warrior's heart" is that you are and a place in your life where things are hard and difficult and you might be afraid and there is hardship, you actually become stronger. when you find ways to be of service in your school, find ways to be of service in your community and with to be of service in the world, not only does that help the people around you, but it makes you stronger. and what was need for me to see was how they started to take off and the refugee camp. one board 15 years old, and he had no budget, no supplies, all he had was one soccer ball. what he would do
's like to make sure that we're able to provide a quality education to every single young child in st. louis. think about how difficult that is. then you think about what that challenge is like in a refugee camp, what's that is like, no classrooms, no curriculum, no building. part of the reasons they did that successfully in the camp was because a lot of young people stepped forward saying i'm going to volunteer, find a way to serve. one of the lessons in the warrior's heart is that if you're in a place in your life where things are hard, difficult, and you might be afraid, and there's hardship is that you actually become stronger when you find ways to be of service in your school, you find ways to be of service in the community and of the world, and not only does that help the world around you, but that actually makes you stronger. what was neat for me to see was how this started to take off in the refugee camps. there was a boy who was 15 years old, no budget, no supplies. he just had one soccer ball, and what he would do every afternoon is take the soccer ball out, and this was app
all the news, the prince. the publishing stories that have public interest and educate the public. wikileaks by contrast is all about just disclosing secrets. you know. the press, typical press, investigative journalism, that is how they get their permission wikileaks sets up internet lockboxes all designed to collect possible automation in a way that can scrub the laws. so you have these distinctions between methods and the missions of wikileaks versus traditional press such that if the government decides to bring a case in wikileaks i have some confidence that the rest of the press will not be chilled. but, obviously that is a tough line to draw. and it is getting tougher and tougher with more immediate, more news being disseminated by sort of these alternative routes , bloggers and the like. >> so let's do one more question here and then we will take some from the audience and a couple of minutes. so picking up, again, on the judge's comments about -- about some extent of over classification or misclassification and also on cans discussion of the hard issues that are posed by t
education to every single young child in st. louis. think about how difficult that is and what the challenge is like in a refugee camp and what that is like, no classroom or curriculum or buildings. parts of the reason they were able to do that successfully is a lot of young people stepped forward and said i am going to find a way to volunteer and one of the lessons in "the warrior's heart" is if you are at a place in your life where earnings are difficult and you might be afraid, you actually become stronger when you find ways to be in service with schools and in service in your community and in the world not only does it help the people around you it makes you stronger. what was needed was how this started to take off in the refugee camp. one boy was 15 years old and had no budget, no supplies. all he had was one sucker ball and set up a soccer team for younger kids in the camp. one message that we want to get across in "the warrior's heart" is it is a message for young people, you can find a way to serve right now in this tough place. if all you have is the soccer ball there's a way for y
. it will aim to ensure that young people with an aura months of being unemployed or the than formal education are presented with either the offer of a job, continuous education, apprenticeships. this'll be the support of the european social fund. we also introduce a framework to help young people and transitions for employment to work. we are taking these measures to prevent the lost generation in europe. honorable members, it is not just some jobs where we have to turn to reality. it is essential that by the end of this year, the agreement on the single supervisory for banks, but also a precondition for banks in the european stability mechanism. by reaching agreement on this, the european union has an opportunity to restore confidence in demonstrate capacity to take difficult decisions in times of crisis and to send a message of stability. it does not seize this moment and let it also be cleared reaching agreement on these issues is a fundamental precondition if you want to be credible in economic and monetary union. regarding the single supervisory mechanism for banks, without the ongoing p
for making it better. may i know that we are trying to contribute further to the education and the post post has a conference with some very senior former intelligence officials, hackers and others coming up at the end of the month and they can find out more at "washington post".com. >> host: will it be up into the public? >> guest: it will be open to the public.
everybody is a link so anybody that is on line as a potential avenue. it is a public education issue. it's like in the 1960's the seat belt campaign they didn't use to make cars with seat belts. there was a big issue. nobody's .1 to put on a seat belt and they began to buckle up for safety. now if we ever really think of getting in the vehicle without putting on your seat belt is just a reflex. you do it. it would be great and a great bowl for us to have that same kind of action and reflex capability where cyber is concerned. >> so what is the symbol -- >> we have a campaign called think connect, which is designed to mask people before the download and e-mail from a source they've never seen before, for example, they really think what could that be, and protect themselves. and there's a whole host of things individuals can do. again we have them posted on the website commands to a number of entities across the country in terms of what individuals can do they are trying to push down to younger people. you mentioned kindergarteners. yes as they grow up this is just a part of their life. th
tried to do spent i had a couple follow-up questions. part of the issues education for people in the audience is, you write these reports. who do you think your audience is? >> with multiple audiences. our audience is partly -- we have an obligation by statute to report both to the attorney general, the head of the agency and to congress to keep them currently and fully informed of any problems we found. so our audiences are multiple. one, it's the agency itself, the people who are running the program. two, the congress which has oversight over the programs, and i think they have an important right to know. and three, two large extent the american people. the american people have a right to know how their government is operating, it is having problems, have how it can be improved. we thought we should make that known and write our report for those multiple audiences because i always told people we need to write us a technical expert technical expert understands and recognizes that there's benefit in the report, and by. we need to write it so that a member of congress who picks
the great work that you do to help educate america. my wishes only every liberal was required to hear you or read your books. >> contribute to why af we are often the only conservatives that college kids will hear in four years at college. at syracuse a couple years ago when told me about everything happening in a green party meeting. i said are you able? how you know, ? he said i used to be a green. what are you doing a of the republican club? he said you spoke year after 9/11 and nobody else made sense. so i became a republican and [applause] there's a reason they don't college students to hear me. >> that leads into my question. i am surrounded by so many liberals that formed their opinion on only half of the information. try listening to fox news or and -- down hall or ann coulter. how do steer them to listen that is not just liberal based? why can't the republicans do a better job to explain conservative values? what can be done about it? >> as far as liberals to unplug their years that is a challenge. when he moved in one year-ago every single one was a liberal he has now proudly an
and helped david horowitz educate america that have very unchain really badly needs it. every -- >> they sent right-wingers like david and me to college campuses where often the only conservative campuses but here in four years of college at syracuse university a few years ago, i usually have dinner with college republicans afterwards. on one of them told me about everything happening at a green party meeting. i said finally, what are you a mall? how do you know? he said no, used to be green. i said what are you doing at the member of the republican click now? and he said he spoke year after 9/11 and nobody else is making sense. you were the only person who made sense, so i became a republican. [applause] there's a reason they don't want college students to hear me and david. >> that kind of that kind of leads me to make two part question is then surrounded by so many liberals have informed opinion, but only on half the information. i say what it should try listening fox news or ann coulter or david horowitz or some thing. so i guess one quick question is how is she steered them to listen to
] at a time when he's cutting the education budget by 11%, the transport budget by 15% and the police budget by 20%, how can he even be giving up on a cut in the e.u. budget before the negotiations have been in. >> we have to make cuts in budgets because we're dealing with a record debt and deficit. [cheers and applause] if he wants to talk about consistency, perhaps he can explain why his own members of the european parliament voted against the budget freeze in -- [inaudible] last year? perhaps he can explain why the socialist group in the european parliament that he's such a proud member of are calling not for an increase in the budget, not for a freeze in the budget, but for a 200 billion euro increase in the budget, and while they're at it they want to get rid of the rest of the british rebate. is that his ?oil. >> ed milliband. >> it's good to see -- it's good to see -- it's good to see the crimson tide -- >> order, order. government back benches including ministers, apparently approaching maturity. they've really got -- [laughter] no, i dare not. they've got to tackle their behavioral
to engage the practicing bar, people from corporations, people who are not lawyers in the educational enterprise and also when public policy discussions. obviously we have a great advantage in being in washington d.c. and having so much access to the world of policy. but in addition, it's not just the location. it has to be your orientation as a law school. so it is something that i've emphasized since i've arrived, but long predates me, that this school wants to always be the place to convene public policy discussions, to create a forum for actionable information, to create an opportunity for nonpartisan and bipartisan discussion. as i like to stay in d.c., but outside the glare of d.c., not on a congressional hearing room floor, not a formal interagency process, but in academic and touche in, where important policy discussions can be had and maybe we can move the ball forward on important issues of thought leadership. in that regard, we are thrilled to be able to host this conference. and this is part of a series of conferences we have held over the last few years on the important r
, to great health care as a human right. i'm the only candidate that supports funding for education, free public education through university. and i think we need new leadership in congress, we need progressive leadership and we also need progressive taxes. neither of my opponents tax plans would actually address the deficit. we can raise $1.2 trillion of flashes deficit through progressive taxation like we had in the eisenhower years. i will close by saying that our people and our plan, we need actions and we commitment and that's why i ask voters to vote for me on november 6 because real solutions can't wait. >> moderator: ann marie buerkle. buerkle: thank you again for this opportunity. when i ran for office three years ago i made a pledge to the district, it will have to be compact and for. we promise we will be accessible, responsible, accountable and independent. we've had 40 plus town hall meetings. with a 60 mobile download units. we have been, we've met with hundreds of people in its history, farmers, business owners, women, seniors. we have been accessible and would have been ac
are investing in education and development of future capabilities and procedures and we have to invest them -- invest in them as we go forward. >> can i do a short follow up on that? how does that approach applied to the army today and the contractor support? they become diminished as part of that. >> i think potentially they might a little bit. >> in terms of numbers. >> yeah in terms of numbers but they will still play a role. >> how do you incorporate into the planning what those numbers need to be particularly on the contractor side? >> i think what we do is first trade-offs trade-offs work in this form and what they want to do is have the right balance because again contractors provide unique capabilities that we simply don't have. that is what they will focus on. we have civilians giving us the continuity and consistency we need and then we need our military members to provide us experience, expertise and frankly sometimes just the validity of what we are trying to do based on their experiences. i think that is what we are trying to capture. what i'm saying now is that his overbalance
, the people who get out now have formed -- there are enough of them that they are educating us about truth of our trivia and there's been several books published about life in north korea, and we now have a much better picture of what the truth of the existence is. .. >> you can't even mail a letter so the exiles created a black market in information. they hire chinese couriers to cross the border and deliver messages, or sometimes they deliver chinese cell phones to a north korean relative, tell the relative to go to an area near the border at a certain day and hour, turn on the phone, and receive a phone call from the relative who escaped to a different country. in south korea, north korean exiles formed organizations whose purpose is to get information into north korea, to give just one example, there are four radio stations run by north korean exiles that broadcast daily to north creigh -- north korea. the man tray of the kim family regime that north korea is the greatest, most prosperous nation on earth and that the north korean people are the happiest is being exposed for the lie it
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